No matter what your situation is, there is a home financing solution for you. We are ready to guide you through your options and get you the best mortgage possible for your unique scenario!

Conventional

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FHA

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VA

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Jumbo

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Rehab

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USDA

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Mortgage Home Loan

How the process works

1

Documentation

There are a few critical documents we will need to verify to start your process.  Learn More
2

Appraisal

The appraisal insures the home you are buying is worth the price that is being offered. Learn More
3

Initial Underwriting

The Underwriter will verify that all information is accurate and authentic. Learn More
4

Conditional Approval

Conditional Approval is granted when the Underwriter approves the loan under certain conditions. Learn More
5

Clear To Close

The Underwriter verifies that all documentation has been provided and all conditions have been met. Learn More
6

Closing

Signing the final documentation and receiving the keys to your new home! Learn More

Documentation:

Appraisal:

Underwriting:

Conditional Approval:

Clear to Close:

Closing:

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All About Phoenix

Phoenix, AZ

Phoenix is red rocks, blue sky and golden sunshine. Phoenix is mountain trails and city lights. Phoenix is palm-canopied resorts and mural-adorned streetscapes. Phoenix is the cosmopolitan heart of Arizona and the soul of the American Southwest.

Serene desert gardens, one-of-a-kind museums, award-winning dining and more: Make sure these can’t-miss spots are on your Phoenix to-do list.

Sunny skies, spring training baseball and a plethora of food festivals are just a few of the reasons to make Phoenix your springtime destination.

Greater Phoenix—affectionately known as the Valley of the Sun—comprises more than 20 cities and towns. Get a lay of the land and discover top things to do and places to eat in each of the Valley’s regions. (source: https://www.visitphoenix.com/)

Things To Do In Phoenix:

Come Spend A Day In Phoenix!

Phoenix ranks as one of the fastest-growing cities in the nation.  Because of our beautiful weather, you’ll be able to enjoy most activities all year-round. Check out the links on this page and find out for yourself why Phoenix is such a dynamic city.

If you are looking for something not listed, please use our custom search on this page.

  • DESERT PRESERVES AND HIKING
    View trail maps, learn about places for great family hikes and for hiking with your dog, and find out about recreation opportunities for residents with disabilities.
  • GOLF PHOENIX
    Find a golf course near you, book  a tee time, or find out about golf specials.
  • ARTS AND CULTURE IN CITY PARKS
    Discover art facilities and programs and find cultural facilities, museums and historical sites.
  • PHOENIX CONVENTION CENTER
    Discover the award-winning Phoenix Convention Center located in the heart of Downtown Phoenix.
  • CITY ATTRACTIONS
    Visit an arts or cultural venue or desert  part/preserves and discover the Phoenix Points of Pride.
  • TRANSPORTATION
    Get information about airports, public transit, streets, parking and traffic.
  • PHOENIX FACTS
    View city statistics and community information and learn about the Phoenix marketplace and Phoenix census data.
  • PHX TV
    Watch the city’s television channel to get information about city programs, services, news and information.

(source: https://www.phoenix.gov/visitors)

Education in Phoenix

About Phoenix Educational System

Public education in the Phoenix area is provided by 33 school districts. There are 21 elementary school districts, which contain over 215 elementary schools, and they are paired with 4 high school districts, which have a total of 31 high schools serving Phoenix. Three of the high school districts (Glendale Union, Tempe Union and Tolleson Union) only partially serve Phoenix. With over 27,000 students, and spread over 220 square miles, The Phoenix Union High School District is one of the largest high school districts in the country, containing 16 schools and nearly 3,000 employees. In addition, there are 4 unified districts, which cover grades K-12, which add an additional 58 elementary schools and 4 high schools to Phoenix’s educational system. Of those four, only the Paradise Valley district completely serves Phoenix.Phoenix is also served by an expanding number of charter schools, with well over 100 currently operating in the city.

Arizona State University is the main institution of higher education in the region. Its main campus is in Tempe. ASU also has campuses in northwest Phoenix (ASU West Campus), downtown Phoenix (ASU Downtown Campus), Mesa (ASU Polytechnic Campus), and Glendale (Thunderbird School of Global Management). ASU is one of the largest public universities in the U.S., with a 2012 student enrollment of 72,254.

A branch of the University of Arizona College of Medicine is located near ASU’s downtown Phoenix campus. There is also a small satellite campus for Northern Arizona University (based in Flagstaff) located in Phoenix.

The Maricopa County Community College District includes ten community colleges and two skills centers throughout Maricopa County, providing adult education and job training. Phoenix College, part of the district, was founded in 1920 and is the oldest community college in Arizona and one of the oldest in the country. (source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Phoenix,_Arizona#Education)

Phoenix Image Gallery

History of Phoenix

Phoenix is rich in history!

For more than 2,000 years, the Hohokam people occupied the land that would become Phoenix. The Hohokam created roughly 135 miles (217 km) of irrigation canals, making the desert land arable. Paths of these canals would later become used for the modern Arizona Canal, Central Arizona Project Canal, and the Hayden-Rhodes Aqueduct. The Hohokam also carried out extensive trade with the nearby Anasazi, Mogollon and Sinagua, as well as with the more distant Mesoamerican civilizations. It is believed that between 1300 and 1450, periods of drought and severe floods led to the Hohokam civilization’s abandonment of the area.

After the departure of the Hohokam, groups of Akimel O’odham (commonly known as Pima), Tohono O’odham and Maricopa tribes began to use the area, as well as segments of the Yavapai and Apache. The O’odham were offshoots of the Sobaipuri tribe, who in turn were thought to be the descendants of the formerly urbanized Hohokam.

The Akimel O’odham were the major Native American group in the area, and lived in small villages, with well-defined irrigation systems, which spread over the entire Gila River Valley, from Florence in the east to the Estrellas in the west. Their crops included corn, beans, and squash for food, while cotton and tobacco were also cultivated. Mostly a peaceful group, they did band together with the Maricopa for their mutual protection against incursions by both the Yuma and Apache tribes. The Maricopa are part of the larger Yuma people; however, they migrated east from the lower Colorado and Gila Rivers in the early 1800s, when they began to be enemies with their Yuma brethren, settling amongst the existing communities of the Akimel O’odham.

The Tohono O’odham lived in the region as well, but their main concentration was to the south, and stretched all the way to the Mexican border. Living in small settlements, the O’odham were seasonal farmers who took advantage of the rains, rather than the large-scale irrigation of the Akimel. They grew crops such as sweet corn, tapery beans, squash, lentils, sugar cane, and melons, as well as taking advantage of native plants, such as saguaro fruits, cholla buds, mesquite tree beans, and mesquite candy (sap from the mesquite tree). They also hunted local game such as deer, rabbit, and javalina for meat.

When the Mexican–American War ended in 1848, Mexico ceded its northern zone to the United States and residents of that region became U.S. citizens. The Phoenix area became part of the New Mexico Territory. In 1863 the mining town of Wickenburg was the first to be established in what is now Maricopa County, to the northwest of modern Phoenix. At the time Maricopa County had not yet been incorporated: the land was within Yavapai County, which included the major town of Prescott to the north of Wickenburg.

The U.S. Army created Fort McDowell on the Verde River in 1865 to forestall Native American uprisings. The fort established a camp on the south side of the Salt River by 1866, which was the first non-native settlement in the valley after the decline of the Hohokam. In later years, other nearby settlements would form and merge to become the city of Tempe, but this community was incorporated after Phoenix. (source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Phoenix,_Arizona#History)

Phoenix Neighborhood

Check out Phoenix Neighborhood

Phoenix is a very large city located in the state of Arizona. With a population of 1,563,025 people and 359 constituent neighborhoods, Phoenix is the largest community in Arizona.

Unlike some cities where white-collar or blue-collar occupations dominate the local economy, Phoenix is neither predominantly one nor the other. Instead, it has a mixed workforce of both white- and blue-collar jobs. Overall, Phoenix is a city of sales and office workers, service providers, and professionals. There are especially a lot of people living in Phoenix who work in office and administrative support (14.54%), sales jobs (11.69%), and management occupations (9.09%).

Also of interest is that Phoenix has more people living here who work in computers and math than 95% of the places in the US.

The percentage of people in Phoenix who are college-educated is somewhat higher than the average US community of 21.84%: 26.72% of adults in Phoenix have at least a bachelor’s degree.

The per capita income in Phoenix in 2010 was $24,231, which is upper middle income relative to Arizona, and middle income relative to the rest of the US. This equates to an annual income of $96,924 for a family of four. However, Phoenix contains both very wealthy and poor people as well.

Phoenix is an extremely ethnically-diverse city. The people who call Phoenix home describe themselves as belonging to a variety of racial and ethnic groups. The greatest number of Phoenix residents report their race to be White, followed by Black or African-American. Phoenix also has a sizeable Hispanic population (people of Hispanic origin can be of any race). People of Hispanic or Latino origin account for 41.30% of the city’s residents. Important ancestries of people in Phoenix include Irish, English, Italian, and Polish.

Phoenix also has a high percentage of its population that was born in another country: 20.03%.

POPULAR PHOENIX NEIGHBORHOODS

(source: https://www.neighborhoodscout.com/az/phoenix)

Dan Zufall

Producing Branch Manager  //  NMLS #452556

Dan Zufall is a top 1%, 2021, 2020 & 2019 Five Star Mortgage Professional, 8 time Super Mortgage Professional and the leader of the Intelligent Mortgage Planning Team, servicing clients throughout the Nation. For the past 22 years, Dan and his team have been providing award winning service along with sound financial education for their clients looking to buy, sell, or invest in real estate. Dan is licensed to serve his clients’ financing needs in Arizona, California, Colorado, Florida, Iowa, Illinois, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, North Dakota, Oregon, and Wisconsin.

On a personal level, Dan is a devout family man, and he enjoys spending quality time with his wonderful wife (college sweet-heart), as well as watching his teenage son play a variety of sports. Dan is an obsessed golfer himself, but his son is a heck of a lefty pitcher, quarterback, and basketball player so golf will have to wait! Dan and his family moved to Scottsdale, Arizona in 2014 to expand the business, but they are blessed to be able to spend their summers on the Lake in Minnesota where he and his wife grew up.

DanZufall@Leader1.com
AZ Team (602) 529-8478MN Team (952) 777-2285
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